5 Questions to Ask Before Choosing a Mover

Whether you are relocating to a new home or a new office, you have to pick the best option for you making your move as stress-free as possible. Continue reading to learn more about which five questions to ask about a long-distance moving company before choosing a mover.

1. Are You a Certified, Licensed Moving Company?

Any reputable business will have no problem providing you with documentation proving that they are, in fact, a licensed moving company. 

You want to make sure that the moving company that you choose is verified by the United States Department of Transportation (USDoT) under the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMSCA)

2. Do You Offer All of the Services That I Need?

Can the moving company you’re looking into do it all, from packing supplies to shipping your belongings to unpacking the truck? A long-distance move is about more than the loading and delivery of your belongings.

Ask your potential moving companies about all of the services they offer and match up to the requirements you have set for your movers.

3. Should I Expect Any Additional Fees?

Moving is already a stressful feat. The last thing you want is to find out at the last minute that there are additional fees for something you thought was standard. You don’t want any kind of surprises on moving day. Ask the movers from the beginning if your move requires any special services that require additional fees.

4. Do You Have References?

Ask potential professional moving companies for references before hiring them. You will be trusting your expensive belongings and keepsakes to them during the move. An experienced, professional, trustworthy moving company will be happy to provide you with references. 

Also, take the time to explore and do your own research about the company. In addition to references, Don’t rely on references alone, also pursue online reviews. See if you can get input from friends, family, and others in your community who have used the same professional movers. 

5. When Can I Expect My Delivery?

If you are working on a set timeline or are a little impatient when it comes to waiting, you want to know when to expect the truck’s arrival. Maybe traffic or other issues may prevent you from making it to the new house or office on time, so you want to be prepared.

Most companies will have a time frame for estimated arrival or offer a tracking system to know exactly when the truck will be at the new home or office. 

Choosing a Mover, Making the Right Choice

Now you know what to look for when choosing a mover for your next relocation; you’ll be prepared to hire your new mover. Pick the right one for you!

Contact us today to get started.

AMSA Government Affairs Update

Last month, several sizable changes came out of Washington, DC, that will impact the moving industry, including an amendment to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), as well as two updates to small business loan programs.

See below to learn about what these changes are and what they mean for movers.

An amendment for the Household Goods Working Group of the FMCSA was submitted in the House of Representatives to create several consumer protections. 

HHG Amendment

First, the HHG Working Group requires movers to link to or feature a copy of their “Ready to Move Tips for a Successful Interstate Move” on their websites as well as provide a copy (or electronic copy) of “Your Rights and Responsibilities When You Move” document when giving a potential customer an estimate.

The amendment also requires movers to offer virtual surveys of the household goods to be shipped. It also closed a loophole that rogue movers would exploit by vastly inflating charges for moving items not covered in the estimate.

Economic Injury and Disaster Loan

The Small Business Administration has reopened its loan program to businesses that have been impacted by the Coronavirus crisis.

Main Street Lending Program

Companies that are not eligible for The Small Business Administration’s EIDL can apply for loans from the Main Street Lending Program.

Knowing your rights as a customer is essential for protecting your belongings and financial security. For more information on the HHG amendment, you can view it here.

Helping Your Kids Adjust to Their New Home

While moving is exciting, it can also be stressful. Stress can be unusually high for kids who are leaving their home and friends behind. Here are some ways you can help your kids adjust to their new home.

Prepare Them

Talk with your kids before you prepare to move. Explain why you are moving. Assure your child that although many aspects of their lives will change, your love for them will remain the same. Welcome their questions, and be as open with them as possible.

Encourage Participation

Assign your child chores related to the move. Give them some responsibility. Also, encourage your child to pack their own belongings. This way they feel more comfortable that their things will be waiting for them at the new house. Let your child pack a box of their favorite items to carry in the car so that they can unpack as soon as you arrive.

Make Their Room Familiar

Children feel more comfortable when surrounded by familiar things. Set up their room as soon as possible and try to keep the same rugs, spreads, and other objects as in your previous house. If you feel you must change some item of decor, let the child help choose the new items.

Expect Regressive Behavior

Stressful situations can cause children to regress, especially with potty-training, baby talk, and separation anxiety. Stay calm if your child does regress. Allow them to adjust at their own pace. If regression continues for more than a few months, contact a doctor.

Allow Grief and Anxiety

Most kids require at least six months to become acclimated to their new surroundings. Even if your child is excited about the move, accept that they may have moments when they cry for old friends or seem cranky or out of sorts. These teary times and tantrums are normal.

Model Emotions

If you have a positive attitude about the move, chances are your child will too. Likewise, any negativity will also spread to your child. Letting your child see you experience sadness is okay; it provides the child an opportunity to learn how to manage emotions constructively.

Maintain Schedules

Children find security in schedules and rituals. Maintain similar mealtimes and family times as at your old home. Do the same bedtime rituals in the same order for toddlers. Consider putting baby to bed in the old crib or on old crib sheets.

Show Them How to Make Friends

Practice opening lines with kids, such as “Hi, my name is Joan. I moved here because my mom just got a new job.” Remind them how easily they made friends at the old house and encourage them to easily make friends at their new home.  

Explore the New Community

Take your child on a fun tour around the new neighborhood and surrounding community. Discover new places of interest for the whole family like exciting parks, playgrounds, and historical spots. Find fun places like a donut shop or ice cream shop where you can begin to create new family memories.

Getting There

If you are making plans for your move, we can help. Contact us for a free quote.